How Do Nail Polish Removers Work?

Have you wondered how this clear liquid cleans up the darkest of shades of Nail Polish remover. Well we did a break down for all those beauties and inquisitive geeks out there.

Basically, there square measure 2 totally different styles of enamel removers: solvent and non-acetone.

Most brands carry each types- it’s typically declared right on the front label. Both varieties contain a solvent (like acetone) that works by dissolving the onerous film that is left on your nails by the ingredients within the polish. Nail paint contain ingredients like resins, plasticizers, film formers, and color pigments.

All these ingredients work to leave you with a pleasant even coat of polish that dries quickly and equally. The problem is these ingredients are not so easy to remove.

ACETONE POLISH REMOVER

It is a terribly powerful solvent and it works the most effective at removing polish. But it is also terribly harsh as a result of which it removes heaps of natural oils from your skin. In fact, typically your skin can look very white if you have used an excessive amount of solvent there on. That means you’ve dried your skin out.

PROS

Most effective way to remove nail polish.

CONS

Harsh and extremely drying of nails, cuticles and skin. Women with nails that square measure dry or cacophonous ought to avoid victimisation.

NON-ACETONE POLISH REMOVERS

Non-acetone removers use less aggressive solvents like ester, alcohol and gas carbonate. Even polish removers labelled as “natural” or “organic” still use a solvent, they only do not use solvent. They conjointly add moisturizing agents like glycerine, panthenol and soy to attenuate the drying result. However, these formulations do not dissolve the polish coating as expeditiously therefore you’ll need to figure more durable methods to remove off the recent polish.

PROS

Gentler than acetone, less drying (though these solvents still can be drying, just less so than acetone).

CONS

Don’t work as well as acetone, requires more effort to remove (especially dark colors) and won’t work on shellac (no-chip) manicures.


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